For the roads we are responsible for we carry out regular safety inspections to find and repair problems on Cambridgeshire’s highways. However we also rely on members of the public to report issues to us.

You can report a new highways problem or see updates on existing problems quickly and easily using our online reporting system

The tables below detail:

  • whether we repair a reported problem or not. This is dependent on the road classification
  • the intervention levels for issues which need repairing
  • when the repairs will happen

Potholes

A pothole is a hole in the road that is deeper than 40mm and wider than 75mm in any horizontal direction. They are usually formed during the winter months as a direct result of snow, ice and prolonged periods of rain and occur where an area of the road's surface has broken up and fallen out.

When a pothole or other road problem is reported to us we inspect and risk assess them to prioritise their repair. Some potholes will be made safe and then permanently repaired as part of other programmed works. Others are monitored as part of routine inspections, as the risk to public safety is not sufficient to merit any remedial action.

The tables below show the different classifications of potholes and the response times.

Potholes on roads
Road typeCategory 1Response TimeCategory 2Response Time
Strategic and Main >40mm 5 days 20 - 40mm 12 weeks
Secondary >50mm 5 days 40 – 50mm 12 weeks
Other >50mm 5 days <50mm Monitor
Pothole and Trips on footways
Road typeCategory 1Response TimeCategory 2Response Time
All Footways >25mm deep/high 36 hours 20 - 25mm deep/high 12 weeks
Potholes on cycleways
Road typeCategory 1Response TimeCategory 2Response Time
Strategic, Main and Secondary >40mm 5 day 20 - 40mm 12 weeks
Others >40mm 5 days 20 – 40mm Monitor

Manhole Covers and Drain Covers - iron works

The table below shows the response times for all iron works.

Iron Works
Road typeCategory 1Response TimeCategory 2
Carriageway >40mm level difference with frame 36 hours Same as c/way pothole levels
Footway/Cycleway >20mm 2 hours

Flooding

We will attend a site if there is standing water 2 hours after heavy rainfall which inhibits the free flow of traffic. If on a category 1 road, we will respond within 2 hours if the flooding leads to network restrictions/safety concerns. In this instance you can expect warning signs or other mitigation to be deployed.

If there is standing water 2 hours after heavy rainfall which inhibits the free flow of traffic on a category 2 road we will investigate the cause of flooding within 28 days.

Drainage

Blocked gullies (silted above outlet) leading to network restrictions or safety concerns will be investigated within 2 hours for category 1 roads.

Gullies are routinely cleaned once a year and more often if required. Other forms of drainage are checked, cleaned or repaired when required, or when a problem is reported to us.

Sometimes a gully may appear to be blocked but the problem could be with the drain into which the gully is connected.

Traffic Signalled Junctions and Crossings

Traffic Signals are used to manage traffic flow or improve the safety of vehicles and/or pedestrians.  These are either at junctions or at standalone pedestrian crossings.  If the signals go out or have another issue due to a fault we will attend to fix them within the times below, response times are dependent on the severity of the issue not on the classification of road.

Signals off, road traffic accident, signals stuck or red lamp out - 2 hours to attend site, make safe within 4 hours.

Any lamp other than a red lamp out - Attend and repair within 1 day.

All other faults, for example with the vehicle detectors - Attend and repair within 3 days.

Road Markings

Road markings are used to define roads, bus and cycle lanes, and traffic calming schemes. They also help enforce parking or loading areas and reduce damage to the side of roads.

Any faded or worn road markings on the highways, which we are responsible for, will be responded to within the following response times depending on their severity and road category.

Road Markings
Road typeCategory 1Response TimeCategory 2Response Time
Strategic Give Way, Stop Lines 5 days 30% loss of effective marking 12 weeks
Main and Secondary Distributors Give Way, Stop Lines 5 days 50% loss of effective marking 12 weeks
All other roads Give Way, Stop Lines 5 days 70% loss of effective marking 12 weeks
Footways and Cycleways Give Way, Stop Lines 5 days 70% loss of effective marking 12 weeks

Grass, Hedges, Trees and Weeds

During the summer months, we have an annual grass cutting programme to maintain the grass verges along Cambridgeshire roads. Our grass cutting programme takes place between May and October.

On principle roads and roads between villages this is done twice a year; the first cut takes place between May and July, and the second cut takes place between August and October. Within urban areas and villages we cut the grass three times a year; the first cut takes place between May and June, the second between July and August and the third between September and October.  This is county wide and based on average growth.

The majority of the grass cutting across Cambridgeshire is carried out by one of the County Council's contractors. However, formal agreements are in place with some District and Parish Councils who carry out the grass cutting in their area on behalf of the County Council.

If you notice an area where the length of grass is causing a safety issue you can report it to us via our online reporting tool.

The majority of grass verges next to roads and footpaths are the responsibility of the County Council, however, if the land is privately owned or has not yet been adopted by the Council, the Council will not cut the grass. This principle is the same for hedges and trees' if we consider a reported issue relating to vegetation to be a problem we will contact the landowner responsible and ask them to arrange for their hedges/trees to be cut back.

Hedges and Trees
Road typeCategoryResponse Time
All Unstable tree causing danger of collapse onto highway 2 hours
Tree in poor condition and there is a likelihood of damage to persons or property 36 hours
Verges
Road typeCategoryResponse Time
All >150mm deep over 5m long 14 days

For further detail on our Reactive Maintenance Intervention Levels please refer to our asset management page

Vegetation

The County Council is responsible for the maintenance of vegetation along the majority of roads and pathways across Cambridgeshire. We have an annual grass cutting programme to ensure verges are kept to a low height. We will also deal with any overhanging or overgrown trees or hedges provided they are above our intervention levels detailed in the table below.

However if the land is privately owned or has not yet been adopted by the council, we are not responsible. If we get a report about overgrown or overhanging vegetation on privately owned land, and we consider it to be a problem, we will contact the landowner responsible and ask them to arrange for their hedges/tress/grass to be cut.

Please see our grass cutting page for more information.

If you notice an area where grass, hedges, trees or weeds are causing a safety issue you can report it to us via our online reporting tool.

Road Classifications

The table below details the different categories of roads in Cambridgeshire.

Road Classifications
Hierarchy DescriptionType of Road General DescriptionDescription
Motorway Limited access motorway regulations apply Routes for fast moving long distance traffic. Fully grade separated and restrictions on use.
Strategic Route Trunk Roads and some Principal ‘A’ roads between Primary destinations

Routes for fast moving long distance traffic with little frontage access or pedestrian traffic. Speed limits are usually in excess of 40 mph and there are few junctions. Pedestrian crossings are either segregated or controlled and parked vehicles are generally prohibited.

Main Distributor Major Urban Network and Inter-Primary Links. Short – medium distance traffic Routes between Strategic Routes and linking urban centres to the strategic network with limited frontage access. In urban areas speed limits are usually 40 mph or less, parking is restricted at peak times and there are positive measures for pedestrian safety.
Secondary Distributor Classified Road (B and C class) and unclassified urban bus routes carrying local traffic with frontage access and frequent junctions. In rural areas these roads link the larger villages and HGV generators to the Strategic and Main Distributor Network. In built up areas these roads have 30 mph speed limits and very high levels of pedestrian activity with some crossing facilities including zebra crossings. On-street parking is generally unrestricted except for safety reasons.
Link Road Roads linking between the Main and Secondary Distributor Network with frontage access and frequent junctions. In rural areas these roads link the smaller villages to the distributor roads. They are of varying width and not always capable of carrying two way traffic. In urban areas they are residential or industrial inter-connecting roads with 30 mph speed limits random pedestrian movements and uncontrolled parking.
Local Access Road Roads serving limited numbers of properties carrying only access traffic. In rural areas these roads serve small settlements and provide access to individual properties and land. They are often only single lane width and unsuitable for HGV’s in urban areas they are often residential loop roads or cul-de-sacs.
Soft Roads (Green Lanes) Unmade unclassified Exclusively in rural areas carrying mainly agricultural vehicles and pedestrians

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